Graduate Degree Fairs Hit the Northeast

The Idealist Graduate Degree Fairs are off to a tremendous start! We’re beginning the season with a tour of the Northeast.

Last week’s fair in New York City was barely fazed by the intense thunderstorm and tornado warnings. A line formed down the block as we welcomed almost 2,000 individuals to connect with representatives from 200 graduate schools.

On Monday we set up shop in Providence, one of the smallest cities on our tour. Dedicated volunteers from the Urban Education Policy graduate program at Brown University helped us run the event smoothly. About 250 prospective students chatted with 76 grad schools.

The next day we headed 40 miles north to Boston University, where they served better-than-average chowder in the student union while the Red Sox played right down the street. Over 1,200 grad school seekers got the chance to meet with 180 grad degree programs – this student-filled city always makes for a busy fair (below).

Next, we’re coming to Pittsburgh (tonight, September 23) and Philadelphia (September 27). Hope to see you there!

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Staff photo from the Boston fair

[This blog entry appeared on an older version of Idealist; any broken links are a result of having re-launched our site in Fall 2010.]

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Grad Fairs Coming to Providence, Pittsburgh, and Many More Cities

Thinking about going to grad school? Our 2010 season of Graduate Degree Fairs for the Public Good kicks off this Thursday in New York City, and we’ll have stops in six more cities in September alone. (Yes, we are trying to get lots of rest this week!)

From Flickr user GypsySeoul (Creative Commons)

First up (click on a city name and fair date to learn more or RSVP):

…And you can browse the whole list of cities and dates on this page.

If you’re in one of these cities, we hope you’ll stop by to meet admissions representatives from degree programs including social work, public policy, public health, law, and many more. All of the fairs are free to attend; run from 5:00-8:00 p.m.; and offer a panel discussion covering topics about applications and financial aid that lasts from 6:00-7:00 p.m.

If you can’t make it, you can peruse our Graduate Education Resource Center, and connect with some of our exhibitors via Twitter using this list.

[This blog entry appeared on an older version of Idealist; any broken links are a result of having re-launched our site in Fall 2010.]

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Graduate Degree Spotlight: Journalism

If you visit our site often, you probably know that we run a series of graduate degree fairs every year. The idea is to bring together prospective students with representatives from all sorts of graduate programs whose graduates go on to serve the public good.

To complement the fairs (or to supplement them, for those who can’t make it in person), we have created a series of “degree overviews” — snapshots of several types of graduate programs you may be considering.

Today we’re spotlighting our journalism degree overview. As a field of study, journalism is designed to train graduates to be ethical, objective, and critical writers, with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue careers working for newspapers, broadcast stations and magazines, publishing outlets in the online community, and any setting that involves the relaying and reporting of information.

Journalism is a rapidly changing profession with many possibilities in new and traditional media. With a shift to more up-to-the-minute online format and the participation of everyday people in reporting, journalism is slowly becoming more egalitarian. Journalism-as-public-service has been the root of reporting since its early days. From Benjamin Franklin’s anonymous anti-colonial articles in revolutionary newspapers, to Edward R. Murrow’s on-site World War II reporting, to recent Pulitzer Prize-winning journalism on the war in Iraq—journalists expose truth and bring issues to light that might have otherwise stayed out of the public view.

To learn about the diversity of options within, and versatility of, journalism training programs, click here.

Related post: Considering a Public Interest Law Degree?

[This blog entry appeared on an older version of Idealist; any broken links are a result of having re-launched our site in Fall 2010.]

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Cleveland Career Fair + Nonprofit Career Guides in Print

Our final Nonprofit Career Fair of the season will take place in Cleveland, Ohio this Tuesday, April 20, at Case Western Reserve University. If you’re in the Cleveland area, stop by to learn about career opportunities including jobs, volunteer gigs, internships, and more. Please RSVP if you plan to attend; the fairs are free and open to the public but it helps us if we have a sense of the number of attendees ahead of time.

If you can’t make it to the fair in person—or even if you can—be sure to take a look at The Idealist Guides to Nonprofit Careers. The Guides come in two flavors, one for folks just embarking upon their careers, and one for sector switchers, and they’re now available in bookstores around the United States. Chapters include “The foundation of a successful job search and career,” “Resumes and cover letters,” “A career search doesn’t end when you get a job,” and “The challenges of the job market.” If you read the book, we’d love to hear what you think!

[This blog entry appeared on an older version of Idealist; any broken links are a result of having re-launched our site in Fall 2010.]

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Considering a Public Interest Law Degree?

If you visit our site often, you probably know that we run a series of graduate degree fairs every year. The idea is to bring together prospective students with representatives from all sorts of graduate programs whose graduates go on to serve the public good.

To complement the fairs (or to supplement them, for those who can’t make it in person), we have created a series of “degree overviews” — snapshots of several types of graduate programs you may be considering.

From the UC Berkeley campus

From the UC Berkeley law school, via Ingrid Taylar

Today we’re spotlighting our public interest law degree overview. Public interest law refers to legal practice and education that benefits issues such as civil rights and civil liberties, people living in poverty, environmental protection, immigrants’ rights, women’s rights, and consumer rights. Public interest lawyers can work in a wide variety of roles, including as advocates and lobbyists on issues they care about; policy makers and legislators; and legal counselors representing clients directly.

To learn more about public interest law, what to look for in a law school, and challenges associated with this type of degree, click here.

[This blog entry appeared on an older version of Idealist; any broken links are a result of having re-launched our site in Fall 2010.]

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