Watch, wait, and iterate!

We love how you’re signing up to be Connectors, chatting away on the Hub, and meeting up to amplify all the good happening in your communities around the world.

GLOBE

So we want to step back for a minute and, first, thank you for being on this journey with us.

Second, we’d like to acknowledge that building a network like this takes time, and we appreciate you sticking with us as we work together to get the model right.

Connector Tessa Hawkins in Melbourne, Australia speaks to the value of being slow and steady:

So I’m a person who usually gets hyper-excited about things and when they don’t all take off at rocket speed I deflate like a balloon.

That will not happen this time!

To be honest, I was a little disappointed with the small number of members that we have in the Melbourne team. But then realised that Idealist needs to grow steadily and consistently, and we as Connectors are responsible for that.

So to achieve this I say our first aim should be consistent growth and patience. That is, start growing those linked into the Network.

We agree, Tessa!

Thanks to all of you again for your patience. We truly couldn’t do this without you.

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Awesome photographer shoots grandmas in band t-shirts; blows the doors off his own stereotypes

This week on Idealists in Action, we’re exploring the concept of Home.

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Photography by Jay Hynes

Jay Hynes didn’t set out to prove that grannies rock, but he definitely did.

By photographing grandmas in their homes wearing punk and metal t-shirts in a photo series called “Grandmas Rock,” the Melbourne-based photographer aimed to contrast the rebelliousness represented by rock n’ roll with the more prim and proper lifestyles he expected from his subjects.

A former advertising art director, Jay recently switched career paths to become a full-time music and portrait photographer. He wanted a photo series in his portfolio that would combine his interests in portraits, domestic spaces, and bands—and look really awesome.

As he went out to meet the women he’d be photographing, his assumptions and opinions about what “normal” grandmas do and how they live started to unravel. For starters, their interest in participating in such a conceptual art project was a delightful surprise.

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Photography by Jay Hynes

“I think this part is almost cooler than the actual photos—the fact that all of them said, sure, I’ll do that!” he says. “It showed me that they were trusting and supportive, but more than anything that they were interested in doing something out of the ordinary.”

Before the shoot, Jay sat down with each of the women—strangers that he’d connected to through friends—over a cup of tea to get a sense of their personalities.

“That time spent with them made me realize how much I miss my own grandma,” he says.

Although his project started out as a way to contrast rock n’ roll with the straight-laced exterior of grandmas, he came away from the project inspired by how rad these golden girls really are.

“They don’t take life as seriously as people assume they would. I think if I had asked a bunch of 40-to-50 year old women to do the same thing, the answer would have been no.”

Right on, Jay! We think grandmas are pretty punk rock, too.

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Photography by Jay Hynes

See the complete photo series here.

Have you ever started a project and ended up surprised by how it changed your perspective? Tell us about it in the comments below.

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Join Idealist on March 11 as we launch a new global movement for action and change!

 

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